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Solitary : A Biography (National Book Award Finalist; Pulitzer Prize Finalist)
by Albert Woodfox




Overview -
Praise for Solitary:

FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE IN GENERAL NONFICTION
FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD IN NONFICTION
Named One of Barack Obama's Favorite Books of 2019
Winner of the Stowe Prize
Named the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Book of the Year
Named a Best Book of the Year by the New York Times, the Washington Post, NPR, Publishers Weekly, BookBrowse, and Literary Hub
Winner of the BookBrowse Award for Best Debut of 2019
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

"An uncommonly powerful memoir about four decades in confinement . . . A profound book about friendship . . . Woodfox reminds us, in Solitary, of the tens of thousands of men, women, and children in solitary confinement in the United States. This is torture of a modern variety. If the ending of this book does not leave you with tears pooling down in your clavicles, you are a stronger person than I am. More lasting is Woodfox's conviction that the American justice system is in dire need of reform."--Dwight Garner, New York Times

"A candid, heartbreaking, and infuriating chronicle . . . as well as a personal narrative that shows how institutionalized racism festered at the core of our judicial system and in the country's prisons . . . It's impossible to read Solitary and not feel anger . . . A timely memoir of that experience that should be required reading in the age of the Black Lives Matter movement. It's also a story of conviction and humanity that shows some spirits are unbreakable."--NPR

"Heart-rending . . . Solitary is Woodfox's pointillist account of an already boxed-in childhood and adolescence in the streets of New Orleans--by his own admission, an existence marked by ignorance and devoted to petty and increasingly serious crime--and the near entirety of an intellectually and spiritually expansive adulthood spent in one of the most brutal prisons in the country (and therefore the world) . . . Some of the most touching writing on platonic male friendship I have every encountered . . . 'We must imagine Sisyphus happy, ' Camus famously wrote, and such a prompt is the ennobling virtue at the core of Solitary. It lifts the book above mere advocacy or even memoir and places it in the realm of stoic philosophy."--Thomas Chatterton Williams, New York Times Book Review

"Wrenching, sometimes numbing, sometimes almost physically painful to read. You want to turn away, put the book down: Enough, no more But you can't, because after forty-plus years, the very least we owe Woodfox is attention to his story . . . Solitary's] moral power is so overwhelming . . . Solitary should make every reader writhe with shame and ask: What am I going to do to help change this?"--Washington Post

"Solitary is evidence of Woodfox's extraordinary mental resilience in the face of relentless state cruelty. The pacing is brisk, with brief stops to reflect on the United States' mass incarceration of black people, Woodfox's black identity, and his personal philosophy, much of it centered on the Black Panther Party's 10-Point Program. Woven together, these strands form an indictment of the U.S. criminal justice system that should be read for generations."--Globe and Mail

"We have had the opportunity to read a new book called Solitary by Albert Woodfox. Anyone who believes in capital punishment should read it . . . We should consider the story of Albert Woodfox. How can you call for the death penalty when you know an innocent man could be in the gallows? Is that risk civilized society can take? Not here, not now. Not ever again."--Art Cullen, Storm Lake Times

" Woodfox's] incredible story is necessary reading, not only to understand our era of mass incarceration, but the entire history of the judicial system in America."--Town & Country

"In this devastating, superb memoir, Woodfox reflects on his decades inside the Louisiana prison system . . . The book is a stunning indictment of a judicial system 'not concerned with innocence or justice, ' and a crushing account of the inhumanity of solitary confinement. This breathtaking, brutal, and intelligent book will move and inspire readers."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"In beautifully poetic language that starkly contrasts the world he's describing, Woodfox awes and inspires. He illustrates the power of the human spirit, while illuminated the dire need for prison reform in the United States. Solitary is a beautiful blend of passion, terror, and hope that everyone needs to experience."--Shelf Awareness (starred review)

"A man who spent four decades in solitary confinement for a crime he did not commit tells his shocking story . . . Woodfox explains how he overcame brutal conditions] despite relentless despair . . . An important story for these times . . . An astonishing true saga of incarceration that would have surely faced rejection if submitted as a novel on the grounds that it could never happen in real life."--Kirkus Reviews

"Solitary is an astounding story and makes clear the inhumanity of solitary confinement. How Albert Woodfox maintained his compassion and sense of hope throughout his ordeal is both amazing and inspiring."--Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped from the Beginning, winner of the National Book Award

"Sage, profound and deeply humane, Albert Woodfox has authored an American testament. Solitary is not simply an indictment of the cruelties, absurdities and hypocrisies of the criminal justice system, it is a call to conscience for all who have allowed these acts to be done in our name."--Jelani Cobb, author of The Substance of Hope

"A man who would not be broken. Not by more than 40 years of solitary in Angola, not by maddening injustice in courts, not by beatings, isolation, or loneliness. Albert's courage, wisdom, and kindness will inspire all who fight for social justice and have the good sense to read this book."--Barry Scheck, Co-Founder of the Innocence Project

"Albert Woodfox's extraordinary life story is both an inspiring triumph of the human spirit and a powerful call for the necessity of prison reform."--Van Jones, President of the Dream Corps and Host of CNN's "The Van Jones Show"

"Albert Woodfox shares his coming-of-age story with crystal clear-eyed perspective, holding nothing back as he unwraps the unvarnished truth of his life. Deftly weaving the undeniable threads of race, class, and systemic inequities that made his story--and so many similar ones--possible, his journey of resilience, perseverance, growth, and triumph is at once a cautionary tale, a challenge to all we think we know about the justice system, and an inspiring testimony to the power of the human spirit."--Reverend Leah Daughtry, co-author of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics

"Solitary is the stunning record of a hero's journey. In it a giant, Albert Woodfox, carries us boldly and without apology through the powerful, incredibly painful yet astonishingly inspiring story of a life lived virtually in chains. He is, as readers will learn, a 'Man of Steel.'

Every white person in America must read this book. It should be required reading for every advocate of 'law and order, ' every prosecutor, every warden, every prison guard and every police officer in America. It should be taught in every law school and every political science class. And any 'public servant' currently holding a local, state or federal office who refuses to read it should step down.

As a citizen of the United States, this book embarrasses me deeply. And it makes me furious."--Mike Farrell, author of Just Call Me Mike and Of Mule and Man

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More About Solitary by Albert Woodfox

 
 
 

Overview

Praise for Solitary:

FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE IN GENERAL NONFICTION
FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD IN NONFICTION
Named One of Barack Obama's Favorite Books of 2019
Winner of the Stowe Prize
Named the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Book of the Year
Named a Best Book of the Year by the New York Times, the Washington Post, NPR, Publishers Weekly, BookBrowse, and Literary Hub
Winner of the BookBrowse Award for Best Debut of 2019
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

"An uncommonly powerful memoir about four decades in confinement . . . A profound book about friendship . . . Woodfox reminds us, in Solitary, of the tens of thousands of men, women, and children in solitary confinement in the United States. This is torture of a modern variety. If the ending of this book does not leave you with tears pooling down in your clavicles, you are a stronger person than I am. More lasting is Woodfox's conviction that the American justice system is in dire need of reform."--Dwight Garner, New York Times

"A candid, heartbreaking, and infuriating chronicle . . . as well as a personal narrative that shows how institutionalized racism festered at the core of our judicial system and in the country's prisons . . . It's impossible to read Solitary and not feel anger . . . A timely memoir of that experience that should be required reading in the age of the Black Lives Matter movement. It's also a story of conviction and humanity that shows some spirits are unbreakable."--NPR

"Heart-rending . . . Solitary is Woodfox's pointillist account of an already boxed-in childhood and adolescence in the streets of New Orleans--by his own admission, an existence marked by ignorance and devoted to petty and increasingly serious crime--and the near entirety of an intellectually and spiritually expansive adulthood spent in one of the most brutal prisons in the country (and therefore the world) . . . Some of the most touching writing on platonic male friendship I have every encountered . . . 'We must imagine Sisyphus happy, ' Camus famously wrote, and such a prompt is the ennobling virtue at the core of Solitary. It lifts the book above mere advocacy or even memoir and places it in the realm of stoic philosophy."--Thomas Chatterton Williams, New York Times Book Review

"Wrenching, sometimes numbing, sometimes almost physically painful to read. You want to turn away, put the book down: Enough, no more But you can't, because after forty-plus years, the very least we owe Woodfox is attention to his story . . . Solitary's] moral power is so overwhelming . . . Solitary should make every reader writhe with shame and ask: What am I going to do to help change this?"--Washington Post

"Solitary is evidence of Woodfox's extraordinary mental resilience in the face of relentless state cruelty. The pacing is brisk, with brief stops to reflect on the United States' mass incarceration of black people, Woodfox's black identity, and his personal philosophy, much of it centered on the Black Panther Party's 10-Point Program. Woven together, these strands form an indictment of the U.S. criminal justice system that should be read for generations."--Globe and Mail

"We have had the opportunity to read a new book called Solitary by Albert Woodfox. Anyone who believes in capital punishment should read it . . . We should consider the story of Albert Woodfox. How can you call for the death penalty when you know an innocent man could be in the gallows? Is that risk civilized society can take? Not here, not now. Not ever again."--Art Cullen, Storm Lake Times

" Woodfox's] incredible story is necessary reading, not only to understand our era of mass incarceration, but the entire history of the judicial system in America."--Town & Country

"In this devastating, superb memoir, Woodfox reflects on his decades inside the Louisiana prison system . . . The book is a stunning indictment of a judicial system 'not concerned with innocence or justice, ' and a crushing account of the inhumanity of solitary confinement. This breathtaking, brutal, and intelligent book will move and inspire readers."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"In beautifully poetic language that starkly contrasts the world he's describing, Woodfox awes and inspires. He illustrates the power of the human spirit, while illuminated the dire need for prison reform in the United States. Solitary is a beautiful blend of passion, terror, and hope that everyone needs to experience."--Shelf Awareness (starred review)

"A man who spent four decades in solitary confinement for a crime he did not commit tells his shocking story . . . Woodfox explains how he overcame brutal conditions] despite relentless despair . . . An important story for these times . . . An astonishing true saga of incarceration that would have surely faced rejection if submitted as a novel on the grounds that it could never happen in real life."--Kirkus Reviews

"Solitary is an astounding story and makes clear the inhumanity of solitary confinement. How Albert Woodfox maintained his compassion and sense of hope throughout his ordeal is both amazing and inspiring."--Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped from the Beginning, winner of the National Book Award

"Sage, profound and deeply humane, Albert Woodfox has authored an American testament. Solitary is not simply an indictment of the cruelties, absurdities and hypocrisies of the criminal justice system, it is a call to conscience for all who have allowed these acts to be done in our name."--Jelani Cobb, author of The Substance of Hope

"A man who would not be broken. Not by more than 40 years of solitary in Angola, not by maddening injustice in courts, not by beatings, isolation, or loneliness. Albert's courage, wisdom, and kindness will inspire all who fight for social justice and have the good sense to read this book."--Barry Scheck, Co-Founder of the Innocence Project

"Albert Woodfox's extraordinary life story is both an inspiring triumph of the human spirit and a powerful call for the necessity of prison reform."--Van Jones, President of the Dream Corps and Host of CNN's "The Van Jones Show"

"Albert Woodfox shares his coming-of-age story with crystal clear-eyed perspective, holding nothing back as he unwraps the unvarnished truth of his life. Deftly weaving the undeniable threads of race, class, and systemic inequities that made his story--and so many similar ones--possible, his journey of resilience, perseverance, growth, and triumph is at once a cautionary tale, a challenge to all we think we know about the justice system, and an inspiring testimony to the power of the human spirit."--Reverend Leah Daughtry, co-author of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics

"Solitary is the stunning record of a hero's journey. In it a giant, Albert Woodfox, carries us boldly and without apology through the powerful, incredibly painful yet astonishingly inspiring story of a life lived virtually in chains. He is, as readers will learn, a 'Man of Steel.'

Every white person in America must read this book. It should be required reading for every advocate of 'law and order, ' every prosecutor, every warden, every prison guard and every police officer in America. It should be taught in every law school and every political science class. And any 'public servant' currently holding a local, state or federal office who refuses to read it should step down.

As a citizen of the United States, this book embarrasses me deeply. And it makes me furious."--Mike Farrell, author of Just Call Me Mike and Of Mule and Man

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802148308
  • ISBN-10: 0802148301
  • Publisher: Grove Press
  • Publish Date: December 2019
  • Page Count: 448
  • Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.95 pounds


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In Small Fry, Lisa Brennan-Jobs, daughter of artist Chrisann Brennan and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, looks back at her turbulent California upbringing. When the author was a child, Jobs wouldn’t acknowledge her as his daughter, and she and her mother struggled to make ends meet. Over time, she grew closer to her father, but his remote and thorny personality brought consistent friction to their relationship. This electrifying narrative provides an up-close look at Jobs while exploring timeless questions about family, loyalty and love.

In 1921, Françoise Frenkel established a French-language bookstore in Berlin. The Nazis ascended to power, and in the late 1930s she managed to flee to France and eventually to Switzerland. In 1945, she published A Bookshop in Berlin, a chronicle of her terrifying journey to escape persecution due to her Jewish heritage. The work was rediscovered more than six decades later and first published in the United States in 2019. This spellbinding and suspenseful memoir will prompt discussions on history, morality and human rights.

In Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law, Haben Girma tells her remarkable story. From a young age, Haben, the daughter of Eritrean refugees, was determined to make the world a better place for people like herself. In describing her experiences in school—she was the first deafblind student to graduate from Harvard Law—and as an advocate for those with disabilities, she offers inspiring anecdotes and life lessons with humor and heart.

Albert Woodfox’s Solitary is an unforgettable account of the author’s 40-plus years in solitary confinement. Woodfox, a member of the Black Panther Party, was doing time for armed robbery in Angola Prison in 1972 when a white guard there was murdered. Along with a fellow Black Panther, Woodfox was blamed for the killing, despite a clear lack of evidence, and sentenced to life in solitary confinement. His courageous memoir is an excellent jumping-off point for important conversations about race and the history of the American penal system. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, it’s at once an invaluable critique and an outstanding personal narrative.

 

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