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Through the Children's Gate : A Home in New York
by Adam Gopnik


Overview - Not long after Adam Gopnik returned to New York at the end of 2000 with his wife and two small children, they witnessed one of the great and tragic events of the city's history. In his sketches and glimpses of people and places, Gopnik builds a portrait of our altered New York: the changes in manners, the way children are raised, our plans for and accounts of ourselves, and how life moves forward after tragedy.  Read more...

 
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More About Through the Children's Gate by Adam Gopnik
 
 
 
Overview
Not long after Adam Gopnik returned to New York at the end of 2000 with his wife and two small children, they witnessed one of the great and tragic events of the city's history. In his sketches and glimpses of people and places, Gopnik builds a portrait of our altered New York: the changes in manners, the way children are raised, our plans for and accounts of ourselves, and how life moves forward after tragedy. Rich with Gopnik's signature charm, wit, and joie de vivre, here is the most under-examined corner of the romance of New York: our struggle to turn the glamorous metropolis that seduces us into the home we cannot imagine leaving.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781400075751
  • ISBN-10: 1400075750
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • Publish Date: November 2007
  • Page Count: 318
  • Dimensions: 7.94 x 5.28 x 0.73 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.55 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Travel > United States - General
Books > Biography & Autobiography > Personal Memoirs

 
BookPage Reviews

Through the Children's Gate

Gopnik, author of the best-selling nonfiction book Paris to the Moon (2000), returns with a fresh collection of essays, all related to the experience of being a parent in New York, the city he has called home for the past five years. Taken together, the 20 essays in the book provide a charming overview of life in the Big Apple and serve as a testament to the way in which the city has changed for the better over the past few decades. In Gopnik's view, New York has shed its brutal, uninviting image to become surprisingly family-friendly. The pieces included here center on parenthood and cover topics like the loss of a family pet (a fish named Bluie), the pros and cons of private schools and his daughter's attachment to an imaginary friend (a character named Charlie Ravioli). While these essays are undoubtedly site-specific, they offer something for everyone—not just New Yorkers. As a longtime reporter for The New Yorker, where most of these essays originally appeared, Gopnik has consistently delivered stylish nonfiction. Filled with wonderful anecdotes and unforgettable imagery, this valentine to the city that never sleeps is Gopnik at his best.

A reading group guide is available online at www.readinggroupcenter.com.

 
BAM Customer Reviews