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Walking on Water : Reflections on Faith and Art
by Madeleine L'Engle and Sara Zarr and Lindsay Lackey




Overview -
In this classic book, Madeleine L'Engle addresses the questions, What does it mean to be a Christian artist? and What is the relationship between faith and art? Through L'Engle's beautiful and insightful essay, readers will find themselves called to what the author views as the prime tasks of an artist: to listen, to remain aware, and to respond to creation through one's own art.

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More About Walking on Water by Madeleine L'Engle; Sara Zarr; Lindsay Lackey

 
 
 

Overview

In this classic book, Madeleine L'Engle addresses the questions, What does it mean to be a Christian artist? and What is the relationship between faith and art? Through L'Engle's beautiful and insightful essay, readers will find themselves called to what the author views as the prime tasks of an artist: to listen, to remain aware, and to respond to creation through one's own art.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804189279
  • ISBN-10: 0804189277
  • Publisher: Convergent Books
  • Publish Date: October 2016
  • Page Count: 224
  • Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.4 pounds


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Walking on Water

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