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I Want to Ride the Tap Tap
by Danielle Joseph and Olivier Ganthier




Overview -

Writer Danielle Joseph and illustrator Olivier Ganthier's I Want to Ride the Tap Tap is a day-of-the-week picture book about a Black family who ride the taxi-bus service--called a tap tap--in Haiti, and the fascinating people they meet along the way, illustrated by a Haitian artist known for his vibrant street art.

Monday through Saturday, Claude and Manman walk Papa to the tap tap stop, where Claude meets all sorts of interesting people waiting for the tap tap. Claude wants to join Papa, but Claude has classes at school and chores at home...

On Sunday, Manman and Papa have a surprise for Claude--a ride on the tap tap They go to the beach, where they meet a lady selling mangoes, a fisherman, a straw-hat maker, a steel drummer, and an artist. They show Claude how to fish, make hats, play the drums, and paint.

With Haitian Creole words sprinkled throughout and a glossary at the end, I Want to Ride the Tap Tap is a warm and lively portrayal of everyday life in Haiti.

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More About I Want to Ride the Tap Tap by Danielle Joseph; Olivier Ganthier

 
 
 

Overview

Writer Danielle Joseph and illustrator Olivier Ganthier's I Want to Ride the Tap Tap is a day-of-the-week picture book about a Black family who ride the taxi-bus service--called a tap tap--in Haiti, and the fascinating people they meet along the way, illustrated by a Haitian artist known for his vibrant street art.

Monday through Saturday, Claude and Manman walk Papa to the tap tap stop, where Claude meets all sorts of interesting people waiting for the tap tap. Claude wants to join Papa, but Claude has classes at school and chores at home...

On Sunday, Manman and Papa have a surprise for Claude--a ride on the tap tap They go to the beach, where they meet a lady selling mangoes, a fisherman, a straw-hat maker, a steel drummer, and an artist. They show Claude how to fish, make hats, play the drums, and paint.

With Haitian Creole words sprinkled throughout and a glossary at the end, I Want to Ride the Tap Tap is a warm and lively portrayal of everyday life in Haiti.


 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374312145
  • ISBN-10: 0374312141
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (Byr)
  • Publish Date: December 2020
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 2-6
  • Dimensions: 8.1 x 10.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 pounds


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BookPage Reviews

I Want to Ride the Tap Tap

Claude and Manman usually walk Papa to the tap tap stop, where Claude sees people from his Haitian community boarding the bus on their way to the beach. The bus’s bright colors always catch Claude’s eye, but he has school and chores, and Manman says he can’t ride the tap tap.

Every day, Claude’s desire to ride the vehicle grows. He sees a woman carrying mangoes and dreams of mangoes; he sees a fisherman and fantasizes about “reeling in a jumbo fish”; he sees a woman carrying straw on her head and hopes one day he can weave a hat for Manman; and when he sees a painter heading to the beach, he longs to paint a picture of his own tap tap. Then one day after church, Claude’s dreams come true when Papa and Manman surprise him with a trip on the tap tap to the beachfront.

Author Danielle Joseph incorporates Haitian Creole words throughout I Want to Ride the Tap Tap, a joyous tale of everyday life in Haiti. Her ear for dialogue is particularly strong. “Bon bagay!” Claude often exclaims. The story provides context clues as to its meaning, though a glossary provides a specific translation (“This is good stuff!”). The days of the week, also written in Haitian Creole, provide the story with a satisfying structure.

Debut illustrator Olivier Ganthier’s images pop with vivid colors, especially in the exuberant closing spreads in which Claude has made it to the shore and finally has the chance to do all the things he dreamed of. These scenes have a palpable energy as they portray Claude’s jubilant Haitian community. Children everywhere know what it’s like to experience a day like this, when the week’s work is done and you can simply spend a day with the family you love.

 

BAM Customer Reviews