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The Wright Brothers
by David McCullough and David McCullough




Overview -
The #1 New York Times bestseller from David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize--the dramatic story-behind-the-story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly--Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two brothers--bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio--changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe that the age of flight had begun, with the first powered machine carrying a pilot.

Orville and Wilbur Wright were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity. When they worked together, no problem seemed to be insurmountable. Wilbur was unquestionably a genius. Orville had such mechanical ingenuity as few had ever seen. That they had no more than a public high school education and little money never stopped them in their mission to take to the air. Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off, they risked being killed.

In this "enjoyable, fast-paced tale" (The Economist), master historian David McCullough "shows as never before how two Ohio boys from a remarkable family taught the world to fly" (The Washington Post) and "captures the marvel of what the Wrights accomplished" (The Wall Street Journal). He draws on the extensive Wright family papers to profile not only the brothers but their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them. Essential reading, this is "a story of timeless importance, told with uncommon empathy and fluency...about what might be the most astonishing feat mankind has ever accomplished...The Wright Brothers soars" (The New York Times Book Review).

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More About The Wright Brothers by David McCullough; David McCullough

 
 
 

Overview

The #1 New York Times bestseller from David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize--the dramatic story-behind-the-story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly--Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two brothers--bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio--changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe that the age of flight had begun, with the first powered machine carrying a pilot.

Orville and Wilbur Wright were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity. When they worked together, no problem seemed to be insurmountable. Wilbur was unquestionably a genius. Orville had such mechanical ingenuity as few had ever seen. That they had no more than a public high school education and little money never stopped them in their mission to take to the air. Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off, they risked being killed.

In this "enjoyable, fast-paced tale" (The Economist), master historian David McCullough "shows as never before how two Ohio boys from a remarkable family taught the world to fly" (The Washington Post) and "captures the marvel of what the Wrights accomplished" (The Wall Street Journal). He draws on the extensive Wright family papers to profile not only the brothers but their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them. Essential reading, this is "a story of timeless importance, told with uncommon empathy and fluency...about what might be the most astonishing feat mankind has ever accomplished...The Wright Brothers soars" (The New York Times Book Review).


This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442376083
  • ISBN-10: 1442376082
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Publish Date: May 2015
  • Page Count: 650
  • Dimensions: 5.8 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.4 pounds


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BookPage Reviews

Audio: Good audios = great gifts

Powerful, provocative and deeply disturbing, Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me should be mandatory listening. Coates reads his eloquent assessment of what it means to be black in a decidedly non-post-racial America, and it’s affecting to hear the controlled passion in his voice. Written as a cautionary letter to his 15-year-old son and wrapped in his recollections of growing up in Baltimore and going to Howard University, it’s also a meditation on the ingrained structural racism still present in our society. 

Early in The Story of the Lost Child, the last of Elena Ferrante’s much admired Neapolitan novels, she describes Elena, her main character, as having “a natural ability to transform small private events into public reflection.” Ferrante has perfected that kind of transformation in these four brilliant novels that consider two women, their lifelong friendship and competition, their very different ways of dealing with what limits a woman and what frees her. It is read by Hillary Huber.

Distinguished historian David McCullough has done it again. The Wright Brothers is the fabulously detailed, always riveting story of how Wilbur and Orville Wright taught themselves to fly and changed the world forever. Drawing on the brothers’ diaries, letters and private family correspondence, McCullough recreates their extraordinary achievement in full color, and he narrates in an appealing, let-me-tell-you-a-story voice that enhances his flowing, elegant style.

Elizabeth Alexander’s lyrically written, lyrically read The Light of the World is an elegiac love letter to her husband, Ficre, their harmonious marriage and their two teenage sons. It’s a moving, often raw, often joyful memoir of their life together until his sudden death just after his 50th birthday. An Eritrean, a painter and a chef, he was cherished by family and friends. Acclaimed poet Alexander worked through her loss and longing with words, words that now let us share her journey. 

TOP PICK IN AUDIO
You can look for grand themes and literary gestures in Jonathan Franzen’s new novel, Purity, performed here by a trio of excellent narrators, or you can be swept into the intertwined plot lines that roil around the protagonists as they reveal themselves, their relationships, their very contemporary angst and their quest for identity. We meet young Pip (yes, a nod to Great Expectations), her wildly neurotic mother, the father she’s been searching for and a fabulous Assange-esque activist who leaks big secrets but harbors his own. Their backstories unfold with flashes of mordant wit as Franzen’s dissection of unhappy families reaches dazzling new heights. 

 

This article was originally published in the December 2015 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 

BAM Customer Reviews