menu

Success in Referential Communication
by M. Paul




Overview -
One of the most basic themes in the philosophy of language is referential uptake, viz., the question of what counts as properly understanding' a referring act in communication. In this inquiry, the particular line pursued goes back to Strawson's work on re-identification, but the immediate influence is that of Gareth Evans. It is argued that traditional and recent proposals fail to account for success in referential communication. A novel account is developed, resembling Evans' account in combining an external success condition with a Fregean one. But, in contrast to Evans, greater emphasis is placed on the action-enabling side of communication. Further topics discussed include the role of mental states in accounting for communication, the impact of re-identification on the understanding of referring acts, and Donnellan's referential/attributive distinction.
Readership: Philosophers, cognitive scientists and semanticists.

  Read Full Product Description
 
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
This item is Non-Returnable.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 4 copies from $61.29
 
 
 
 

More About Success in Referential Communication by M. Paul

 
 
 

Overview

One of the most basic themes in the philosophy of language is referential uptake, viz., the question of what counts as properly understanding' a referring act in communication. In this inquiry, the particular line pursued goes back to Strawson's work on re-identification, but the immediate influence is that of Gareth Evans. It is argued that traditional and recent proposals fail to account for success in referential communication. A novel account is developed, resembling Evans' account in combining an external success condition with a Fregean one. But, in contrast to Evans, greater emphasis is placed on the action-enabling side of communication. Further topics discussed include the role of mental states in accounting for communication, the impact of re-identification on the understanding of referring acts, and Donnellan's referential/attributive distinction.
Readership: Philosophers, cognitive scientists and semanticists.


This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792359746
  • ISBN-10: 0792359747
  • Publisher: Springer
  • Publish Date: September 1999
  • Page Count: 172
  • Dimensions: 9.21 x 6.14 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.05 pounds

Series: Philosophical Studies #80

Related Categories

 

BAM Customer Reviews