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A God That Could Be Real : Spirituality, Science, and the Future of Our Planet
by Nancy Ellen Abrams and Paul Davies and Desmond Tutu




Overview -
A paradigm-shifting blend of science, religion, and philosophy for the agnostic, spiritual-but-not-religious, and scientifically minded reader

Many people are fed up with the way traditional religion alienates them, perpetuates conflict, vilifies science, and undermines reason. Nancy Abrams--a philosopher of science, lawyer, and lifelong atheist--is among them, but she has also found freedom in imagining a higher power.

In A God That Could Be Real, Abrams explores a radically new way of thinking about God. She dismantles several common assumptions about God and shows why an omniscient, omnipotent God that created the universe and plans what happens is incompatible with science--but that this doesn't preclude a God that can comfort and empower us.

Moving away from traditional arguments for God, Abrams finds something worthy of the name "God" in the new science of emergence: just as a complex ant hill emerges from the collective behavior of individually clueless ants, and just as the global economy emerges from the interactions of billions of individuals' choices, God, she argues, is an "emergent phenomenon" that arises from the staggering complexity of humanity's collective aspirations and is in dialogue with every individual. This God did not create the universe--it created the meaning of the universe. It's not universal--it's planetary. It can't change the world, but it helps us change the world. A God that could be real, Abrams shows us, is what humanity needs to inspire us to collectively cooperate to protect our warming planet and create a long-term civilization.

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More About A God That Could Be Real by Nancy Ellen Abrams; Paul Davies; Desmond Tutu

 
 
 

Overview

A paradigm-shifting blend of science, religion, and philosophy for the agnostic, spiritual-but-not-religious, and scientifically minded reader

Many people are fed up with the way traditional religion alienates them, perpetuates conflict, vilifies science, and undermines reason. Nancy Abrams--a philosopher of science, lawyer, and lifelong atheist--is among them, but she has also found freedom in imagining a higher power.

In A God That Could Be Real, Abrams explores a radically new way of thinking about God. She dismantles several common assumptions about God and shows why an omniscient, omnipotent God that created the universe and plans what happens is incompatible with science--but that this doesn't preclude a God that can comfort and empower us.

Moving away from traditional arguments for God, Abrams finds something worthy of the name "God" in the new science of emergence: just as a complex ant hill emerges from the collective behavior of individually clueless ants, and just as the global economy emerges from the interactions of billions of individuals' choices, God, she argues, is an "emergent phenomenon" that arises from the staggering complexity of humanity's collective aspirations and is in dialogue with every individual. This God did not create the universe--it created the meaning of the universe. It's not universal--it's planetary. It can't change the world, but it helps us change the world. A God that could be real, Abrams shows us, is what humanity needs to inspire us to collectively cooperate to protect our warming planet and create a long-term civilization.


This item is Non-Returnable.

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807075951
  • ISBN-10: 0807075957
  • Publisher: Beacon Press
  • Publish Date: March 2016
  • Page Count: 200
  • Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 pounds


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