menu

The Black Kids
by Christina Hammonds Reed




Overview -
A New York Times bestseller
A William C. Morris Award Finalist

"Should be required reading in every classroom." --Nic Stone, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dear Martin
"A true love letter to Los Angeles." --Brandy Colbert, award-winning author of Little & Lion
"A brilliantly poetic take on one of the most defining moments in Black American history." --Tiffany D. Jackson, author of Grown and Monday's Not Coming

Perfect for fans of The Hate U Give, this unforgettable coming-of-age debut novel explores issues of race, class, and violence through the eyes of a wealthy black teenager whose family gets caught in the vortex of the 1992 Rodney King Riots.

Los Angeles, 1992

Ashley Bennett and her friends are living the charmed life. It's the end of senior year and they're spending more time at the beach than in the classroom. They can already feel the sunny days and endless possibilities of summer.

Everything changes one afternoon in April, when four LAPD officers are acquitted after beating a black man named Rodney King half to death. Suddenly, Ashley's not just one of the girls. She's one of the black kids.

As violent protests engulf LA and the city burns, Ashley tries to continue on as if life were normal. Even as her self-destructive sister gets dangerously involved in the riots. Even as the model black family fa ade her wealthy and prominent parents have built starts to crumble. Even as her best friends help spread a rumor that could completely derail the future of her classmate and fellow black kid, LaShawn Johnson.

With her world splintering around her, Ashley, along with the rest of LA, is left to question who is the us? And who is the them?

  Read Full Product Description
 
Hardcover
  • Retail Price: $18.99
  • $15.67
    (Save 17%)
Add to Cart
+ Add to Wishlist
local_shippingFor Delivery
In Stock.
FREE Shipping for Club Members help
 
storeBuy Online Pickup At Store
search store by zipcode

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 41 copies from $6.28
 
Download

Format: EPUB What's this?
This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

Customers Also Bought

More About The Black Kids by Christina Hammonds Reed

 
 
 

Overview

A New York Times bestseller
A William C. Morris Award Finalist

"Should be required reading in every classroom." --Nic Stone, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dear Martin
"A true love letter to Los Angeles." --Brandy Colbert, award-winning author of Little & Lion
"A brilliantly poetic take on one of the most defining moments in Black American history." --Tiffany D. Jackson, author of Grown and Monday's Not Coming

Perfect for fans of The Hate U Give, this unforgettable coming-of-age debut novel explores issues of race, class, and violence through the eyes of a wealthy black teenager whose family gets caught in the vortex of the 1992 Rodney King Riots.

Los Angeles, 1992

Ashley Bennett and her friends are living the charmed life. It's the end of senior year and they're spending more time at the beach than in the classroom. They can already feel the sunny days and endless possibilities of summer.

Everything changes one afternoon in April, when four LAPD officers are acquitted after beating a black man named Rodney King half to death. Suddenly, Ashley's not just one of the girls. She's one of the black kids.

As violent protests engulf LA and the city burns, Ashley tries to continue on as if life were normal. Even as her self-destructive sister gets dangerously involved in the riots. Even as the model black family fa ade her wealthy and prominent parents have built starts to crumble. Even as her best friends help spread a rumor that could completely derail the future of her classmate and fellow black kid, LaShawn Johnson.

With her world splintering around her, Ashley, along with the rest of LA, is left to question who is the us? And who is the them?

 

Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781534462724
  • ISBN-10: 1534462724
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
  • Publish Date: August 2020
  • Page Count: 368
  • Reading Level: Ages 14-17
  • Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.7 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds


Related Categories

 

BookPage Reviews

The Black Kids

Christina Hammonds Reed’s debut novel, The Black Kids, is set in 1992 but has a timeliness that often feels uncanny.

Ashley is a privileged Black teenager living the good life in Los Angeles. Her parents have tried to shield her from the reality of life as a Black person in America by enrolling her in the best schools, living in the best neighborhood and giving her the kinds of opportunities that are typically out of reach to the Black scholarship students at her private school. However, her all-white friend group constantly reminds her of her Blackness. 

When four police officers are acquitted in a trial for the beating of a Black man named Rodney King, prompting riots in Ashley’s home city, she begins to realize that in order to find her place in the world, she may need to confront her Blackness and her family’s history—even if it means leaving her old life and friends behind.

Reed addresses experiences common to Black teens in both 1992 and 2020 with grace and nuance. Her sentences are searingly beautiful, and her depiction of the breakdown in Ashley’s belief that her privileged lifestyle affords her a certain degree of protection is raw and relatable. Ashley must face what it means to be considered a so-called “good Black person” and grapple with her own culpability in having made another Black student at her school the target of judgment.

The Black Kids also explores what it means to be a good friend and how we must take responsibility when we treat others poorly, even when we haven’t intended to cause harm. The question of whether anyone can truly be deemed a “bad” person, as opposed to a good person who has done bad things, is threaded expertly through the narrative and is sure to prompt hard but necessary self-reflection from readers. This is a striking debut that fearlessly contributes to ongoing discussions of race, justice and power.

 

BAM Customer Reviews